Wakasagi Rod Building

I sanded down and wrapped the joints with silk thread today, the rod is ready to be lacquered.

itomaki

This is one of the few stages I have actually become really comfortable with doing, and it was quite pleasant.  I need to stop by the supplies store Sakura in Kanda this week (being a long weekend they were closed yesterday and today), to get some line pegs and adhesive. 

Advertisements

6 responses to “Wakasagi Rod Building

  1. You must be very happy. I hope you are documenting the entire process, it looks interesting and I am sure there is a lot of science and art mixed in to the process of rod making and finishing. What kind of thread is that in the picture? The color looks rather bright and saturated. I spoke to an American who had been to India and all he could say was that betel chewing makes your teeth yellow, he said it right before he lit up a cigarette. Soon, I will try it myself….

    • Hi Amy,
      Check out my article for Fishing Fury about building my first rod…it is generally a very scientific process, but made slightly unpredictable as bamboo is after all a natural material and no two pieces are the same. The thread for wrapping is bright red silk, so before it is lacquered it always looks very shiny like in the photo and it is hard to get a good image of it.
      Paan will stain your mouth and teeth red, when you meet an old-timer and he smiles at you, it is pretty obvious! In the days of the Mughal court such a colouration was considered a mark of great beauty among aristocratic ladies. When the King tired of his company and wanted an audience to end, paan brought on trays for his guests was the subtle hint they should grab their coats. Apparently Shahjehan once disposed of a lover of his daughter Jehanara, who reminded him so much of her mother, by having him served paan laced with poison (he had another boyfriend boiled alive, so maybe the death-by-paan guy was the lucky one).
      Cheers,
      Adam

  2. I got lacquered last night with Otosan.

  3. chris: please tell me that “Otosan” is your Japanese father-in-law, and not some weird s&m fetishist thing.

  4. Ha ha! Yes, he’s my father inlaw.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s