Tag Archives: Charcuterie

Latest craze

Cold-smoked salmon.  It is cold enough now at night to cold-smoke fish on my Weber with no special equipment.  This batch was made with Costco salmon, maple syrup-cure (also Costco), onigurumi (Japanese walnut, from Amazon) smoke.  This was my best batch yet.  Whilst I would never be able to slice at the counter of Russ & Daughters, I have done enough salmon now that I can slice the smoked fillet thin enough to be respectable:

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Trafalgar Day smoked salmon

Maple syrup-cured, sakura wood smoke, salmon from Costco.  Night time here in Tokyo is just cold enough now that cold-smoking is possible.  It was not bad.

Lower East Side pilgrimage

Click through for full story.  Warning: contents may lead to uncontrollable urge to eat.

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Where all roads lead

for me, at least.

Paint it black

Home-cured, home-cooked pastrami and pork butt on the Weber.  Some of the memsahib’s friends must have got wind of the pastrami and invited themselves round, so I put on the emergency chunk of pork shoulder to make that most economical, useful dish pulled pork. Perhaps I was a Texian in a previous life.  This was my first attempt at making pastrami.  The proof of course is in the eating…

As Paul Harrell would say, it was “not bad at all”.  I don’t think I have ever eaten pastrami that had as much flavour as this.  It wasn’t as tender as the commercial stuff I have had before, since I didn’t do a steaming/boiling step.  I wanted to keep the bark nice and crisp (and leave less washing up to do) but I did add an extra pot of boiling water inside the Weber for the last few hours.

On a related note, I’ll be eating the real thing (and other tasty Jewish eats) later this year…but that will be for a later post!

Serious charcuterie

…from Sardigna!  Thank you very much regular blog visitor Mr. VS (the kindness of various readers of my blog is amazing…thank you all).  About half the fermented sausage was already consumed by the time I remembered to take a photo….

 

An old man’s a bed full of bones

What’s to do with a kilogram or so of eel innards?  Stew them, in a mix of soy sauce, mirin, maple syrup and sansho, of course.