Tag Archives: Cooking

Fire!!

Cheap beef intestines for me…

And for my guests, wagyu on a stick!

Apparently it was quite good!

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Paint it black

Home-cured, home-cooked pastrami and pork butt on the Weber.  Some of the memsahib’s friends must have got wind of the pastrami and invited themselves round, so I put on the emergency chunk of pork shoulder to make that most economical, useful dish pulled pork. Perhaps I was a Texian in a previous life.  This was my first attempt at making pastrami.  The proof of course is in the eating…

As Paul Harrell would say, it was “not bad at all”.  I don’t think I have ever eaten pastrami that had as much flavour as this.  It wasn’t as tender as the commercial stuff I have had before, since I didn’t do a steaming/boiling step.  I wanted to keep the bark nice and crisp (and leave less washing up to do) but I did add an extra pot of boiling water inside the Weber for the last few hours.

On a related note, I’ll be eating the real thing (and other tasty Jewish eats) later this year…but that will be for a later post!

Japanese Karee raisu

..with a twist!  Thank you very much Mr. W for the nuclear-hot chillies!

Eating this dish I actually started to partly see through time, whilst the memsahib became worried enough to ask me if I was okay.  And I have put a roll of toilet paper in the fridge, of course.

Goby time

Turned out nice again!

Some gobies were caught, killed and eaten.

Tenpura always crisps up nicer if you drain a bit of the oil on kitchen paper or if you are like me and not overly nice about things, old newspaper.  I try not to apply the batter too thick.  This evening we had a last-minute guest, and she  exclaimed at how good haze tenpura is (I suspect she has never eaten real Japanese mahaze before) and how the fish fillets rolled up in the hot oil.   This is a sign of quality not poor frying technique: it means the fish has never been frozen or overly-chilled.  Of course in this case the poor buggers were whizzing about in a bucket until about three hours previously.

An old man’s a bed full of bones

What’s to do with a kilogram or so of eel innards?  Stew them, in a mix of soy sauce, mirin, maple syrup and sansho, of course.

There’s

store-bought sushi, conveyor-belt sushi, and then sushi made by a man whose family have been doing it in the same restaurant for five generations, this time with fish you have caught that day and until about three hours previously had been swimming in the deep blue sea.  I consider it an angler’s duty to cook any fish I kill but just ever so occasionally, it is a pleasure to ask a friend who happens to be a pro to deal with my catch (and I do make sure he takes a good cut of the bag as well for his own use).  I wasn’t disappointed this time, although after the second dish (well-peppered cutlassfish seared on a nuclear-hot pan with butter) I was a bit elevated in my spirits and forgot to take any photos of the cutlassfish arai (scorched then chilled in iced saltwater then sliced paper-thin), or the cutlassfish tenpura, or the fillets seasoned with nothing other than salt and lightly grilled (it needs nothing more) but hopefully these two photos convey a part of the deliciousness (and skill, devotion and dare I say affection, of the chef involved).  Thank you so much Mr. N.!

Close your eyes and think

of England.