Tag Archives: Japanese Bamboo Rods

It’s that time of year again

Haze time!

Most of the fish were disposed of in the orthodox manner:

haze tenpura

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First fishing trip of 2016

Hope you all have a happy New Year with tight lines and tranquil seas for all!

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Turned out nice again

Caught some big ones

At least if you are a tanago angler…

It was hotter and humider than Satan’s codpiece last Sunday in Japan, but out at sea at least there was an occasional breath of wind to relieve the heat.  The weather did not interfere unnecessarily with the main objective of the day’s outing, which was to eat a very large amount of tenpura (whiting, megochi, squid, prawns, shiitake, lots of different veg) washed down with beer and shochu mixers.

I rather felt we were on board a sea-going izakaya rather than a fishing vessel, reinforced by the fact that this was a charter organised by my local bar and there were some very serious drinkers and eaters.  I had a lot of stuff to do in the evening so tried to avoid getting too roaring-drunk, but met with the immense kindness of my hosts (Japanese hospitality seems to get even stronger when out on the water) who plied me with more shochu, more beer, do I need more ice? and so forth.  The hillocks of straight-out-the-pot tenpura, the asari littleneck clams shucked, lovingly skewered on bamboo and grilled with a soy sauce glaze, the infinity of pickles and miso-shiru and rice made me decide I would not need to eat again for about a week (this proved to be wrong, though).

My homemade whiting rod is still giving good service, and occasionally I caught some fish in between the Yebisu beers straight out the cooler.

Thank you very much to Captain Yukio as always, Fukagawa Fujimi and all the regulars at my local izakaya!

Long day

under a hot sun!  I think the monsoon is now over in Japan, rapidly replaced by a burning-hot summer…

One way

to improve a well-equipped sport fishing vessel is to have a deep-fryer on board.  Many thanks as always to Captain Yukio and Fukagawa Fujimi, sailing from Monzennakacho!

First fishing trip of 2015

Concluded happily and without mishap.  It was one of those days when the tide, wind and fish shoals all contrived to combine into perfect conditions for fishing and the whiting literally hooked themselves all day – amazing fishing, for those who could put up with the cold.  My Guernsey frock and a hip flask of rum kept the cold out till the winter sun was up and warmed us all up, but I stopped fishing by about 1pm as I had caught over fifty fish and had no intention of taking any more.  This time I had brought my own bamboo rod that I made in 2011 but for various reasons, hadn’t used for fishing yet.  It is always good to have a good catch with a new rod (bad luck seems to stick to new rods) and although the rod could have been built better, it fished perfectly well and I am very satisifed with its action and weight.  After its first trip like all bamboo rods it needs another firing – the first time it is fished the various fibres and joints undergo the actual tensions and strains of fishing and the firing sets everything into place permanently; I will try to do this next weekend.

Anyway, for posterity I recorded the first fish taken on this rod.

Also the deckhand kindly modelled the rod and catch for me also (I caught the fish!).

Whiting can be eaten in a variety of ways but as I was busy in the evening I made simple English-style fishcakes, a family favourite.  “Secret” tartar sauce on the side, of course.  Whiting are easy to fillet and the dish was made in about 30 minutes.

Back in England fishcakes tend to be deep-fried or cooked under a grill.  Mine were shallow-fried in olive oil and served hot with tartar sauce and a salad of tomatoes.  The dregs of the bottle-conditioned Belgian beer went into my nuka!

Whiting fishcakes with “secret” tartar sauce.

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Leftover whiting were laid out, cured, seasoned with sake and nori flakes and then sun-dried with the next day’s laundry.  In Tokyo winter these are done in a few hours, the air being so cold and dry.  These are perfectly delicious lightly grilled over a fire.

Thanks as always to Fukagawa Fujimi, sailing from Monzennakacho!